Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Mandatory Skills You Need To Compete In This Economy

It used to be that if you had the right technical skills, you could count on a job. Then, as companies received numerous resumes for fewer open positions, they started looking at "soft skills" in addition to "hard skills." After the economy tanked, and with the rise of social networking, we are seeing a new type of skill emerge based on a professional's online influence. If you want to compete in the new global economy, you will have to constantly and persistently develop each of these skill sets.

1. Hard skills

Hard skills consist of tangible skills, such as programming, graphic design, website development, etc. They are specific, teachable abilities that can be defined and measured. These skills fulfill job descriptions — and without them, your resume won't even be looked at. To gain these skills, you can take classes or online tutorials. While some might have natural talents, most people require practice in order to master their trade.

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2. Soft skills

Soft skills measure your emotional intelligence (EQ). Employers are looking for workers who are great communicators, team players and skillful leaders. They also want workers that can be flexible, adapt to change and work independently. A recent study by EMC Research shows that 75 percent of employers think that your writing ability is valuable and 79 percent value your analytical skills.

3. Online influence

Your online influence is how many, and who, you can influence to make decisions. In the online world, this means how many people you can reach with your message, who those individuals are, and how willing they are to spread your message. The number of followers and friends you have on your social networks can impact your career for better or worse. Employers want to hire people who are already established and can help them communicate. Companies understand that those with larger networks are more productive and can generate new business, recruit top talent and market their brand.

Thanks to Dan Schawbel / Blogs Forbes


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