Saturday, January 7, 2012

Informal Learning, The 95% Solution

Informal learning is not better than formal training; there is just a whole lot more of it. It's 95% of workplace learning, according to the research behind this graphic, by Gary Wise.

Since the latter half of the 20th century, we have gone through a period where training departments have been directed to control organizational learning. It was part of the Taylorist, industrial model that also compartmentalized work and ensured that only managers were allowed to make decisions. In this context, only training professionals were allowed to talk about learning. But formal training, usually in the guise of courses, is like a hammer that sees all problems as nails. Unfortunately, these nails only account for 5% of organizational learning.

A significant percentage of workplace learning professionals are solidly grounded in that 5% of workplace learning that is formal training. They know the systems approach to training (SAT), instructional systems design (ISD) and the ADDIE model (analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation), among some less useful things like learning styles and Bloom's taxonomy. There are plenty of hammer-wielders in corporate training departments, supported by an entire industry, including institutions and professional associations, all addressing that 5 percent.

Supporting informal learning at work is not as clear-cut as something like ISD. It requires tools, processes and methodologies from a variety of disciplines. There are methods from knowledge management, organizational development and human performance technology, for example, that are quite useful in supporting informal learning. The modern workplace is a complex adaptive system. There is no single approach that can be used all the time.

We  should not constrain our approach with a single methodological lens when looking at organizational performance. While all models are flawed, some may be useful, and any analysis requires an understanding of the situational context and then the selection of the most useful models. Today there is no agreed-upon informal learning design methodology. I doubt that a single one would be useful anyway.

An industrial age mindset would require a unified approach for informal learning, but the network age demands an acceptance of perpetual Beta. We have many methods and frameworks that can better inform us how to design work systems. When learning is the work, the support systems have to enable both. Integrating the best of what we know from multiple disciplines, in an evidence-based fashion, is the way to proceed and support complex, creative, collaborative work. Several of these next practices have been discussed here or amongst my colleagues.

To create real learning organizations, there is a choice. We can keep bolting on bits of informal learning to the formal training structure, or we can take a systemic approach and figure out how learning can be integrated into the workflow – 95% of the time.

Thanks to Harold Jarche / Jarche
http://www.jarche.com/2012/01/informal-learning-the-95-solution/

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Three Inconvenient Truths

If you think that the best course of action with every team member is always leaving them alone to do their work, you may be headed for trouble. Here are three inconvenient truths you must face.

Some of the people on your team will not be competent to handle every aspect of the job. Then it's your job to coach and train and supervise closely until the situation changes.

Some of the people on your team cannot be trusted to work on their own. There are slackers in the world and you're sure to have at least one on your team during a career. When that happens, your job is to determine if the situation is permanent or temporary. If it's permanent, then your job becomes helping the team member find someplace else to work (or not).

Some of your people simply don't like working on their own. For some it's a way to avoid accountability. Coaching usually works, but not always. Others don't need management, just attention.

Boss's Bottom Line

Not everyone who works for you will be competent and committed on all tasks. Adjust your approach to the person and the situation. Remember: your job is to help the team and the team members succeed.

Thanks to Wally Bock's Three Star Leadership Blog
http://blog.threestarleadership.com/2012/01/05/three-inconvenient-truths.aspx

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Different Strokes For Different Folks? Best Ways Of Presenting 360-Degree Feedback…

Little research exists to provide definitive answers as to the best way to present 360-degree feedback results.  However, it is intuitive that participants have different learning styles, and some may prefer to favor the interpretation of either qualitative versus quantitative presentations of results.

One study that does give some insight about what presentation style might maximize the acceptability, understanding, and interpretation of 360-degree feedback results comes from Atwater and Brett (2003).  These researchers compared several different report presentations to participants and concluded that:

1. Individuals appear to be significantly less positive and less motivated after receiving text feedback than after receiving numeric feedback.

2. Individuals appear to prefer numeric scores and normative feedback in multi-rater interventions. (Note: Based on our Envisia's International partners, it is unusual for them to prefer normative scores. They tend to prefer average scores.)

Some but not all vendors offer choices in report presentation options.  The ability to provide multiple options in feedback reports appears to be helpful for participants to understand and accept feedback and ultimately decide to focus on one or more competency areas for development efforts. For example, Envisia Learning, Inc., provides the following free options for each feedback report, based on coach, consultant, organizational preferences, and the purpose of the 360-degree feedback presentation (www.360online.net/reportOption):

  • Graphical presentation of results (color-coded graphs) comparing self-ratings to those of others
  • Summary tables showing all 360-degree feedback assessment questions by rater categories
  • Comparison results using vendor norms, organizational norms, or average scores
  • Standardized norms presented in graphs, using t-scores or z-scores
  • Most/least frequent behaviors with rating distributions by each rater category
  • Johari Window printing preference, showing a four-box grid comparing self assessment ratings to those of others for each rater category, providing an index of self-insight or self-awareness
  • Multiple methods to access rater agreement, such as a range of scores and a statistical measure of rater agreement based on standard deviation to help participants understand and interpret outliers and polarized perceptions
  • Open-ended questions categorized by rater group or randomly presented

Coach's Critique:

Throughout my experience in coaching, I have learned this…ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL…everyone has a different way of handling the 360-degree feedback data…they have different ways of learning the data, different ways of processing the data, different ways of perceiving the data, and different ways of reacting to the data. With so many different types of people with different personalities, learning styles, and perceptions, it seems obvious that in order to effectively manage participant's processing of the feedback, they would need to be presented with various ways of illustrating the feedback.

For some people, graphical presentations allow them to put their feedback in perspective because it illustrates behavioral patterns in terms of the different categories. For others, graphical data might be complicated and they want to view the lists of items in terms of its frequency. I have seen other clients that seem to emphasize on open-ended feedback, rather than the remainder of the quantitative data. For this reason, when choosing a 360-degree feedback report, it is best to choose one that is either customizable, or one that presents the feedback information in various ways in order to facilitate learning for different types of people.

What do you find the most effective way of presenting 360-feedback results?

Thanks to Sandra Mashihi / Result Envisia Learning
http://results.envisialearning.com/

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How Much Is A Bad Face-To-Face Sales Call Strategy Costing You?

Do your marketing strategies include lead generation, sales methodology, and utilizing virtual selling technologies?  I was recently on a sales call with a software organization that had four sales resources onsite for the meeting and two called in virtually.  This was the first sales call with this customer regarding a new product line (they already had a relationship).  All four sales resources traveled in from all over the United States for a face-to-face sales call.  This isn't an unusual occurrence.

Let's take a look at the impact of using this antiquated selling approach:

 Face to Face Sales Call Customer Acquisition Cost

How can you combat this high Customer Acquisition Cost?

Marketing Involvement

Define a target audience and have marketing drive demand through inbound and outbound activities.  Marketing will help guide buyers through the buyers journey before sales is engaged.   Direct sales resource time will be focused on a higher quantity of qualified leads.

  • Impact - more leads, higher quality leads, reduction in customer acquisition cost

Sales Methodology

Provides guidance regarding who should attend interactions at each step in the process and if the call is best executed virtually or face-to-face. The methodology will also ensure each sales interaction is well organized and specific call objectives are identified.

  • Impact – Improved sales cycle velocity, higher closing ratios, and larger deals

Virtual Selling

While face-to-face sales calls aren't completely obsolete, you don't necessarily need the entire engagement team onsite.  Having 4 resources in a room for a 90 minute meeting is typically not the most effective way to engage a customer.

  • Impact – reduction in customer acquisition cost, more activity

Let's look at the impact

Scenario Two:

 Face to Face Sales Call CPA

It is almost $27K less to run the second sales campaign.  Multiply this number times the total number of sales campaigns your sales team works over a 12 month period.  The cost impact is staggering. 

Call to Action:

  1. Utilize marketing to engage buyers early in the buying process to ensure direct sales resources are focused on qualified leads
  2. Use a defined sales methodology to improve the effectiveness of interactions
  3. Leverage technology to perform interactions virtually whenever possible as part of your Go to Market Strategy
 
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Security Clearance Job Boards

Possess a secret or top security clearance? Certainly a value-add for professionals, having a security clearance is a near necessity for obtaining a job with state and federal government agencies as well as contractors who service government entities.

What jobs require a security clearance? Generally, agencies and companies involved with national security require mission-critical jobs be fulfilled with professionals who hold an active security clearance, or are clearance eligible, so j o b s would include:

  • Project/Program Managers
  • Technical Administrators
  • Business Analysts
  • Contract Specialists
  • Cyber Defense/Network/System Engineers

To locate a job that requires a security clearance, check out the following job boards:

AllPortJobs; http://allportjobs.com

ClearanceJobs; http://www.clearancejobs.com

ClearedConnections; http://www.ClearedConnections.com

ClearedJobs; http://www.clearedjobs.net

CorporateSecurityGigs; http://www.corporatesecuritygigs.com

CorporateSecurityJobs; http://www.corporatesecurityjobs.net

IHireSecurity; http://www.ihiresecurity.com

LawEnforcementJobs; http://www.lawenforcementjobs.com

Maritime Security; http://www.maritimesecurityjobs.com

Private Security; http://www.privatesecurityjobs.com

Security Job Zone; http://www.securityjobzone.com

Thanks to Teena Rose / Resume To Referral
http://www.resumetoreferral.com/blog/security-clearance-jobs/#utm_source=feed&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=feed

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Thursday, January 5, 2012

Books On HR, Training, Development By ASTD & Other Publishers

Books On HR, Training, Development By ASTD & Other Publishers - Jan 4, 2012
 
======================
 
101 Ways To Make Training Active (Active Training Series) By Mel Silberman
 
======================
 
Active Training: A Handbook Of Techniques, Designs, Case Examples, And Tips
(Active Training Series) By Mel Silberman, Carol Auerbach
 
======================
 
Adult Learning Basics (ASTD Training Basics Series) By William J. Rothwell
 
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ASTD Handbook For Workplace Learning Professionals From ASTD Press
 
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ASTD Learning System Flashcards By Tora Estep; Jennifer Mitchell
 
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ASTD Models For Workplace Learning And Performance (ASTD Learning And
Performance Workbook) By Willam J. Rothwell, Ethan S. Sanders, Jeffery G. Soper
 
======================
 
Brilliance By Design: Creating Learning Experiences That Connect, Inspire,
And Engage By Vicki Halsey
 
======================
 
Building Expertise: Cognitive Methods For Training And Performance Improvement
By Ruth C. Clark
 
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Clinical Interviewing By John Sommers-Flanagan, Rita Sommers-Flanagan
 
======================
 
Developing Technical Training: A Structured Approach For Developing
Classroom And Computer-Based Instructional Materials By Ruth C. Clark
 
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Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels (3rd Edition) By Donald L
Kirkpatrick Ph.D., James D Kirkpatrick
 
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Evidence-Based Training Methods: A Guide For Training Professionals By Ruth
Colvin Clark
 
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Group Techniques By Gerald Corey, Marianne Schneider Corey, Patrick Callanan,
J. Michael Russell
 
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Handbook Of Psychological Assessment By Gary Groth-Marnat
 
======================
 
How To Measure Training Results : A Practical Guide To Tracking The Six Key
Indicators By Jack Phillips, Ron Stone
 
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Human Resource Development: Learning And Training For Individuals And
Organizations By John P Wilson, John P. Wilson
 
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ISD From the Ground Up By Chuck Hodell
 
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Needs Assessment Basics (ASTD Training Basics) By Deborah Tobey
 
======================
 
Outsourcing Human Resources Functions: Strategies For Providing Enhanced
HR Services At Lower Cost By Mary F. Cook
 
======================
 
Preventing Death By Lecture! - Terrific Tips For Turning Listeners Into Learners
By Sharon Bowman
 
======================
 
Rapid Instructional Design: Learning ID Fast And Right (Essential Knowledge
Resource) By George M. Piskurich
 
======================
 
Rapid Needs Analysis (The ASTD Learning And Performance Workbook Series)
By Susan Barksdale, Teri Lund
 
======================
 
Return On Investment (ROI) Basics (ASTD Training Basics) By Patricia Pulliam
Phillips, Jack J. Phillips
 
======================
 
Return On Investment In Training And Performance Improvement Programs,
Second Edition (Improving Human Performance) By Jack J. Phillips Phd In
Human Resource Management
 
======================
 
Social Learning For Learning Professionals (Infoline) By Tony Bingham
 
======================
 
Telling Ain't Training By Harold Stolovitch
 
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The Accelerated Learning Handbook: A Creative Guide To Designing And Delivering
Faster, More Effective Training Programs By Dave Meier
 
======================
 
The Adult Learner, Seventh Edition: The Definitive Classic In Adult Education And
Human Resource Development By Malcolm S. Knowles Ph.D., Richard A. Swanson
Ph.D., Elwood F. Holton III Ed.D.
 
======================
 
The Art Of Convening: Authentic Engagement In Meetings, Gatherings, And
Conversations By Craig Neal, Patricia Neal
 
======================
 
The ASTD Learning System By ASTD
 
======================
 
The ASTD Training And Development Handbook: A Guide To Human Resource
Development By Robert Craig
 
======================
 
The Essentials Of Instructional Design: Connecting Fundamental Principles With
Process And Practice (2nd Edition) By Abbie Brown, Timothy D. Green
 
======================
 
The New Social Learning: A Guide To Transforming Organizations Through
Social Media By Tony Bingham, Marcia Conner
 
======================
 
The Psychology Of Executive Coaching: Theory And Application By Bruce Peltier
 
======================
 
The Self-Publisher's Quick & Easy Guide To Isbns And Barcodes (The
Self-Publisher's Quick & Easy Guides) By Joel Friedlander
 
======================
 
The Ten-Minute Trainer: 150 Ways To Teach It Quick And Make It Stick! (Pfeiffer Essential
Resources For Training And HR Professionals) By Sharon L. Bowman
 
======================
 
The Trainer's Handbook: The AMA Guide To Effective Training By Garry Mitchell
 
======================
 
Training Ain't Performance By Harold D. Stolovitch, Erica J. Keeps
 
======================
 
Training And Learning Styles (Infoline ASTD) By Susan Russell
 
======================
 
Training Design Basics (ASTD Training Basics) By Saul Carliner
 
======================
 
Training For Dummies By Elaine Biech
 
======================
 
Training From The Back Of The Room!: 65 Ways To Step Aside And Let Them
Learn By Sharon L. Bowman
 
======================
 
Using Brain Science To Make Training Stick By Sharon L. Bowman
 
======================
 
Workplace Learning & Performance Roles: The Analyst By William J. Rothwell
 
======================
 
Writing Empirical Research Reports: A Basic Guide For Students Of The Social
And Behavioral Sciences By Fred Pyrczak
 
======================
 
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Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Worst LinkedIn Summary Ever

Okay folks, I'm going to give it to you straight: There are certain phrases when used in a LinkedIn profile summary have the same effect as nails on a chalkboard.

In other words, it's such a turn-off as a hiring manager, it's hard to focus on your profile as being credible after reading them. Recently, this is the profile summary someone asked me to review. I've underlined the phrases that make me want to cover my ears and run from my computer screen yelling, "NOOOOO. Not again!"

A dynamic leader with the ability to drive change and proven track record of high accomplishments in various areas. Highly organized individual, believes in empowerment and team work, highly adaptable, strong business sense, effective communicator, result-oriented and can-do attitude.

What makes me cringe when I read this?

For starters, the person is being completely subjective. These aren't facts about them (facts are backed by numbers and statistics). This summary is the person's opinion of themselves – and it comes across as over-confident and canned. Honestly, it's the worst use of a LinkedIn summary you can possible implement… especially during a job search.

If you are looking for a job in 2012, I am begging you not to ruin your profile with an unsubstantiated, over-used summary statement like this one.

What should be there instead?

Facts, facts, and more facts. Tell me about your accomplishments in as few words as possible, using numbers and statistics to support the truth. An example might be:

15+ years of experience leading teams of 10-200 staff members. Managed 30+ projects ranging from $100K-$1.7M in budget. 200+ hours of presenting and training on a wide variety of subjects including innovation, teamwork and project management.

See the difference?

In the original summary, the person is claiming to be all those things. In the revised summary they are proving it.

When it comes to your LinkedIn summary, remember you need to compel the reader to scroll down the page and look at your work history. These days, bragging won't make that happen. Stating facts that entice them to see where you accomplished them will.

Want to have your LinkedIn profile reviewed by a career expert?

Go to CareerHMO.com today and sign up risk-free. You can submit your LinkedIn profile (as well as any other career tool) for review by an expert. That way, you can be sure you are making the right impression!

J.T. O'Donnell is the founder of CAREEREALISM.com and CEO of CareerHMO.com, a web-based career development company.

Thanks to J. T. O'Donnell / Careerealism
http://www.careerealism.com/linkedin-summary-worst/

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More Proof That Crappy Exit Interviews Do More Harm Than Good...

It's true.  It's better to do nothing on the exit interview front than to do it poorly.  Example below with a hat tip to Deadspin:

"Tweets Sean Locklear, tackle extraordinaire: "Worst exit meeting ever! No coaches,no front office, just physicals and goodbye to teammates! We did just spend 5 mos together, WOW!"

That was a tweet from an NFL player who was going through the Washington Redskins exit process that's conducted at the end of a season.  Of course, he later pulled the tweet down after it caused a small storm.  But not before we got the window into his soul.

Clinically, the exit process was fine.  Checking to see if anything was wrong or if anything needed to be followed up on - we get it and expect it. 

But underneath, once you say you're going to do an exit interview, the expectations rise, usually with one question that has two parts:

"Where's the presence of someone who cares, but also someone that can make a change if things didn't go well for me while I was here?"

And that my friends, is a big, big burden.  Most people won't tweet out their dissatisfaction, but you can bet they're asking the same question if you handle your exit interviews in a similar fashion.

You've got some exit interview forms and your coordinator is running people through your "Exit Interview" process face to face.  Is that enough?  Or does it actually take your company's "approval rating" down a couple of notches?  Would it be better to follow up a few weeks after the ex-employee has left the company, when expectations are lowered, emotions have calmed, etc.?

Think about it.  Your exiting employees and NFL players have more in common than you might think.

Thanks to Kris Dunn / HR Capitalist
http://www.hrcapitalist.com/2012/01/more-proof-that-crappy-exit-interviews-do-more-harm-than-good.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+hrcapitalist+%28The+HR+Capitalist%29

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101 Ways To Make Training Active (Active Training Series) By Mel Silberman

101 Ways to Make Training Active (Active Training Series)

101 Ways to Make Training Active (Active Training Series)
By Mel Silberman

List Price: $60.00
Price: $46.33 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25. Details

Availability: Usually ships in 24 hours
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

46 new or used available from $29.96

Average customer review:
(12 customer reviews)

Product Description

When it was first published in 1995, Mel Silberman's 101 Ways to Make Training Active became an instant bestseller. Now this revised and updated second edition offers the same dynamic approach and several completely new case examples. The examples support each exercise and highlight real-time uses of the highly successful Active Training method. In addition, the book includes 200 training tips that form the nuts-and-bolts of successful active training. These tips incorporated in the book's top ten lists show how to build quality, activity, variety, and direction into your training programs.

For the first time 101 Ways to Make Training Active features a CD-ROM containing all the original "Top Ten Trainers Tips and Techniques" lists for easy reproduction and distribution.

Product Details
  • Amazon Sales Rank: #86265 in Books
  • Published on: 2005-05-25
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 11.06" h x 1.04" w x 8.54" l, 2.05 pounds
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 336 pages
Editorial Reviews

Review
"Silberman's book proves that learning can be fun. Its usable, practical ideas make training come alive!" —--Edward E. Scannel

Review
"If you want to shift from lecture-based learning (or lack of it) to participant-centered (with plenty of transfer), then 101 Ways to Make Training Active belongs in your library. Mel never fails to provide practical tools and strategies for making training come alive."
--Bob Pike, chairman and CEO, The Bob Pike Group and author, The Creative Training Techniques Handbook

"I can now retire my beat-up copy of Mel's original 101 Ways to Make Training Active that I have been using the last ten years. The second edition is even more practical. It retains the original brilliance and adds new and powerful activities. I am planning to buy two copies and keep one of them under lock and key."
--Sivasailam "Thiagi" Thiagarajan, resident mad scientist, The Thiagi Group and author, Design Your Own Games and Activities

"Wow! 101 Ways to Make Training Active has just gotten better! What a great new collection of creative and useful ways to make training active and improve learner retention. I can't wait to try them out."
--Jean Barbazette, president, The Training Clinic and author, Instant Case Studies

"Mel Silberman has done it again! With this second edition, he has polished to perfection his fabulous 101 Ways to Make Training Active. Sparkling with easy-to-read and easy-to-use ideas, this gem of a resource is a must-read for anyone in the training profession. You will use the wealth of material found in this book until its pages are flagged, dog-eared, and worn out."
--Sharon Bowman, author, The Ten-Minute Trainer: 150 Ways to Teach It Quick and Make It Stick

"We all know that learning by doing beats every other instructional method hands down. That's why this book is so important. It's packed with ideas for greatly improving learning effectiveness. A must resource for all trainers."
--Dave Meier, director, The Center for Accelerated Learning and author, The Accelerated Learning Handbook

From the Back Cover
When it was first published in 1995, Mel Silberman's 101 Ways to Make Training Active became an instant bestseller. Now this revised and updated second edition offers the same dynamic approach and 101 completely new case examples. The examples support each exercise and highlight real-time uses of the highly successful Active Training method. In addition, the book includes 200 training tips that form the nuts-and-bolts of successful active training. These tips incorporated in the book's top ten lists show how to build quality, activity, variety, and direction into your training programs.

For the first time 101 Ways to Make Training Active features a CD-ROM containing all the original "Top Ten Trainers Tips and Techniques" lists for easy reproduction and distribution.

Praise for 101 Ways to Make Training Active

"If you want to shift from lecture-based learning (or lack of it) to participant-centered (with plenty of transfer), then 101 Ways to Make Training Active belongs in your library. Mel never fails to provide practical tools and strategies for making training come alive."
Bob Pike, chairman and CEO, The Bob Pike Group and author, The Creative Training Techniques Handbook

"I can now retire my beat-up copy of Mel's original 101 Ways to Make Training Active that I have been using the last ten years. The second edition is even more practical. It retains the original brilliance and adds new and powerful activities. I am planning to buy two copies and keep one of them under lock and key."
Sivasailam "Thiagi" Thiagarajan, resident mad scientist, The Thiagi Group and author, Design Your Own Games and Activities

"Wow! 101 Ways to Make Training Active has just gotten better! What a great new collection of creative and useful ways to make training active and improve learner retention. I can't wait to try them out."
Jean Barbazette, president, The Training Clinic and author, Instant Case Studies

"Mel Silberman has done it again! With this second edition, he has polished to perfection his fabulous 101 Ways to Make Training Active. Sparkling with easy-to-read and easy-to-use ideas, this gem of a resource is a must-read for anyone in the training profession. You will use the wealth of material found in this book until its pages are flagged, dog-eared, and worn out."
Sharon Bowman, author, The Ten-Minute Trainer: 150 Ways to Teach It Quick and Make It Stick

"We all know that learning by doing beats every other instructional method hands down. That's why this book is so important. It's packed with ideas for greatly improving learning effectiveness. A must resource for all trainers."
Dave Meier, director, The Center for Accelerated Learning and author, The Accelerated Learning Handbook

Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

48 of 50 people found the following review helpful.
5An excellent resource for trainers and teachers
By A Customer
I used this book while teaching college students, and I found it to be a wonderful source of ideas for in-class exercises. Some really successful exercises I used in class: "Hotseat," where groups of students attempt to answer questions and then choose another group of students to take their place. "Trial," where an issue or idea is put on trial, and groups of students act as the defense attorneys, prosecuting attorneys, and jury. The best thing about the ideas in this book is the adaptability--there are general enough that you can tailor the exercises and games to your field. In short, it's a great resource that I would recommend to anyone involved in teaching or training.

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful.
5MEANINGFUL activities
By Layla Halabi
This is the best collection of meaningful activities I've come across. All the activities are designed to achieve a purpose and are right on target. The pages are designed so that you can easily follow and understand the activities that are grouped into application area or need.

The book covers active training techniques for team building, stimulating discussion, on-the-spot assessments, prompting questions, and reviewing strategies. There are quite a few more, as well a section in the beginning with 'tips' for the trainer, like learning names, timesavers, role-playing, setting-up the training room, etc.

You will hardly ever conduct a training that will not benefit from a quick peek into this book and the ideas and suggestions included. I honestly believe that no training bookshelf should be without this book: The activities are targeted, relevant to the subject matter and guranteed to produce the desired results.

You will not find any 'wishy-washy' activities and games here nor will you catch yourself yawning as you turn the pages. It's quite the opposite in fact; this book is so well written and well presented, that you just might find yourself going through all the 101 activities! And while you're at it, why don't you check 'Active Training' by Mel Silberman as well - it's a gem of a book...

Don't hesitate, this is one purchase you will never regret.

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful.
5Increase Learning - Train Actively!
By Keith E. Webb
As a professional trainer and coach I know my subjects well. That's my problem! It's too easy to stand up and lecture. The trick is to involve participants in meaningful ways. "101 Ways to Make Training Active" is just the ticket.

Silberman begins with 20 "top 10" lists of training tips. For example, "Ten assignments to give learning partners" and "Ten suggestions for activating a lecture" and "Ten options for role playing", etc. Each of the 200 tips are written in brief bullet-point style that stimulates creativity. Every list gave me ideas of how to improve my training - and that's the point!

The bulk of the book, 244 additional pages, are 101 ways to make training active. The activities are grouped together into 15 sections according the flow of a training program: How to Get Active Participation from the Start, How to Teach Information, Skills, and Attitudes Actively, and How to Make Training Unforgettable.

I love these ideas! These are some of my favorite.

Actively engage participants early on by handing out a "quiz" on the training topic. Have them work individually then compare answers with others. This allows participants to share information, build team work, and engage in the topic. Another idea with similar objectives is "Go to Your Post". Place 3 or 4 dichotomous choices around the room and ask participants to go the the post they most relate with. Groups at each post discuss why they relate to that choice, or characteristics of that choice, or how to use that choice, etc. Groups report back to the main group with their learning.

Do you have a lot of information to get across? Try lecture Bingo. Randomly arrange your main speaking points on a 3 x 3 grid, or Bingo card. As you speak, listeners take notes and mark the speaking points until they get a Bingo (3 marked squares in a row). Acknowledge the Bingo and keep going allowing others to Bingo using your speaking points. Sounds chaotic, but it's fun!

As a coach trainer, skill development is the main focus of my courses. Silberman includes some excellent variations on role plays and skill practice. "Show, But NOT Tell" is when the training demonstrates a skill before explaining it. Participants are asked to observe and then explain what the trainer did. Another non-threatening activity places the trainer in the key role and involves the group in providing responses along the way. For example, in a coaching role play, the trainer stops and asks the group, "What question might I ask next?"

Reviewing learning through the use of memorable methods will further increase the impact of learning. Fun, creative, and above all memorable methods of reviewing learning include Jeopardy and Who Wants to be a Millionaire game show reviews. Silverman gives instructions make either activity easy to create and to lead.

I've seen a lot of books on training games or activities. Most has a couple of "winners" but this one just doesn't quit. Buy it, use it, and watch participation, learning, and your course evaluations improve!

http://astore.amazon.com/amazon-book-books-20/detail/0787976121

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Active Training: A Handbook Of Techniques, Designs, Case Examples, And Tips (Active Training Series) By Mel Silberman, Carol Auerbach

Active Training: A Handbook of Techniques, Designs, Case Examples, and Tips (Active Training Series)

Active Training: A Handbook of Techniques, Designs, Case Examples, and Tips (Active Training Series)
By Mel Silberman, Carol Auerbach

List Price: $50.00
Price: $35.92 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25. Details

Availability: Usually ships in 24 hours
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

75 new or used available from $30.00

Average customer review:
(11 customer reviews)

Product Description

Since 1990, Mel Silberman's classic book, Active Training, has been a runaway best-seller for trainers at all levels and a popular text for university level courses in adult education and training. The active training method—which turns the spotlight away from the instructor and put the emphasis on the learner—has emerged over time as a proven and reliable method for enhancing involvement, learning, and change.

The third edition of Active Training, provides a thorough introduction to the core principles of active training design and delivery and includes a wealth of examples, tips, and techniques. The book has been revised to reflect the latest trends in workforce training and key sections, such as assessment and evaluation, have been thoroughly updated. In addition, a completely new chapter has been included to cover the design of active training for e-learning and online applications.

Product Details
  • Amazon Sales Rank: #10205 in Books
  • Published on: 2006-04-14
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 1.19" h x 8.24" w x 9.48" l, 2.01 pounds
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 380 pages
Editorial Reviews

Review
"Since its initial publication, Active Training has become a classic book in the field of training and development.  It remains a must-read for anyone who wants training to be effective and engaging."
--Sivasailam "Thiagi" Thiagarajan, author, Design Your Own Games and Activities; president, International Society for Performance Improvement

"Active Training is a one volume "encyclopedia" full of the soundest concepts and practical ideas for applied adult learning you can find. No professional involved in learning, development or workplace performance should be without it."
--Ed Betof Ed.D., vice president, Talent Management and chief learning officer, Becton Dickinson

"Active Training has been required reading for all our students since 1992.  They refer their managers and staffs to it often to help change the way their organizations view and conduct training.  Of all of the books required in the program, this is the one they cite as the most valuable!"
--Brenda S. Levya-Gardner, Ph.D. director, executive HRD graduate program, Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio

"The third edition of Active Training continues its rich tradition of weaving theory with best practice that works so well for university classrooms as well as business contexts.  Especially welcome is the expanded content on e-learning!  I am confident that our students will be thrilled with new edition of Active Training."
--John A. Sample, Ph.D., program coordinator, Adult Education and Human Resource Development, Florida State University

From the Inside Flap
Since 1990, Mel Silberman's classic book, Active Training, has been a runaway best-seller for trainers at all levels and a popular text for university??level courses in adult education and training. The active training method—which turns the spotlight away from the instructor and puts the emphasis on the learner—has emerged over time as a proven and reliable method for enhancing involvement, learning, and change.

The third edition of Active Training, provides a thorough introduction to the core principles of active training design and delivery, and includes a wealth of examples, tips, and techniques. The book has been revised to reflect the latest trends in workforce training and key sections, such as assessment and evaluation, have been thoroughly updated. In addition, a completely new chapter has been included to cover the design of active training for e-learning and online applications.

Active Training will show you how to

  • Assess training needs and participants
  • Develop active training objectives
  • Create practical opening activities
  • Prepare brain-friendly lectures
  • Design active training exercises
  • Create e-learning applications
  • Provide for back-on-the-job application . . . and much more!

Fasten your seat belts, this is no passive read. The book is filled with real-world cases, sample exercises to complete and try out, and hundreds of practical tips and techniques guaranteed to improve any training program.

This new edition includes a supplementary instructor's guide that is available at no charge from Pfeiffer.com.

From the Back Cover
Join the Active Training Revolution

"Since its initial publication, Active Training has become a classic book in the field of training and development. It remains a must-read for anyone who wants training to be effective and engaging."
—Sivasailam "Thiagi" Thiagarajan, author, Design Your Own Games and Activities; president, International Society for Performance Improvement

"Active Training is a one volume 'encyclopedia' full of the soundest concepts and practical ideas for applied adult learning you can find. No professional involved in learning, development or workplace performance should be without it."
—Ed Betof, Ed.D., vice president, Talent Management and chief learning officer, Becton Dickinson

"Active Training has been required reading for all our students since 1992. They refer their managers and staffs to it often to help change the way their organizations view and conduct training. Of all of the books required in the program, this is the one they cite as the most valuable!"
—Brenda S. Levya-Gardner, Ph.D. director, executive HRD graduate program, Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio

"The third edition of Active Training continues its rich tradition of weaving theory with best practice that works so well for university classrooms as well as business contexts. Especially welcome is the expanded content on e-learning! I am confident that our students will be thrilled with new edition of Active Training."
—John A. Sample, Ph.D., program coordinator, Adult Education and Human Resource Development, Florida State University

Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful.
5Many good ideas on how to make your training more active
By Gary Lim (garylimc@mbox2.singnet.com.sg
This book has many good ideas on how to make your training more active. For example, it give one ideas on how to turn a mundane one-way lecture into a lively interactive discussion so that the participants not only enjoy the learning, but retain and use the knowledge gained. In addition, there are many activities that a trainer can use to make his or her training more lively. I strongly recommend this book to all trainers.

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful.
5Activate Your Training
By Keith E. Webb
Mel Silberman is the master of active training. Just skimming his book gave me a handful of new ideas I applied to my training. Reading the book helped me to revamp my training courses to include many more participatory training exercises.

Everybody loves being involved, talking, interacting, and exploring during training. Lecture, however, is too often the default methodology. In some ways lecture takes less time to prepare and is less risky, but is it more effective learning? In this day and age, linear, slow, from-up-front training just isn't effective. Instead, shift over to active training that engages and empowers participants to learn rather than be taught. I'm reminded of Winston Churchill when he said, "I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught."

Silberman gives idea after idea of how to spice up lectures, or better yet, replace them with other a dozen other learning methods that actively involve the participant. The 100+ exercises and examples in Active Training makes it easy to incorporate non-cheesy learning activities that really work.

Wake up your participants! Get active.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful.
5Superb book
By Mr. Stephen J. Desmond
There are other books which provide numerous examples of participatory exercises during training days but fail completely to explain the value and relevance of the activities they promote.

Mel Silberman's Active Training (3rd. ed.) does the opposite. The author clearly explains the benefits and reasons for using the many useful techniques supplied. No wonder this book has several glowing reviews on Amazon.com.

I have selected below a number of aspects of this book that I found especially useful to my own seminars. These are -

1) Setting learning goals, specifying objectives, communicating those objectives to others

2) The critical question for designing the content and structure of a training program

3) The 3 key goals and types of opening exercises

4) 10 ways to obtain participation

5) Chapter 4 (Preparing brain-friendly lectures) is superb and particularly relevant to seminar leaders who deliver complex and technical material to a professional audience. The range of tips and activities to enliven a lecture style format is very impressive.

6) The 3 major ingredients of designing a training program

7) Chapter 8 on sequencing training activities is excellent in its focus on ensuring that the program does not randomly comprise a
string of exercises and that instead the activities are weaved together to maximise the effectiveness of the event.

8) Chapter 9 which focuses on 5 types of activities that can be used at the appropriate stage of the seminar

9) Chapter 12 on gaining leadership of the training group, especially the parts on setting group norms, and increasing receptivity to your leadership

10) Making smooth transitions and linkages between the various stages of the event, and facilitating lively discussion

11) Chapter 14 is very good on facilitating structured activities and on how to avoid 5 common mistakes

12) How to close the training program by reviewing program content and how to encourage delegates to prepare for applying skills learned after the event

13) Chapter 17 on evaluating a training program, and the importance of obtaining feedback during the event, not just at the end. The elaboration of Kirkpatrick's 4 levels of evaluation is also very useful.

http://astore.amazon.com/amazon-book-books-20/detail/0787976237

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Adult Learning Basics (ASTD Training Basics Series) By William J. Rothwell

Adult Learning Basics (ASTD Training Basics Series)

Adult Learning Basics (ASTD Training Basics Series)
By William J. Rothwell

List Price: $29.95
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Average customer review:
(3 customer reviews)

Product Description

With a globally-aging workforce, organizations are reexamining adult learning theory and how it is applied to employee development. Adult Learning Basics addresses individual learning competencies, organizational learning climate, and technology-related issues as they affect the adult learning process.

Author, William J. Rothwell, a renowned learning expert, simplifies the complicated and often academic subject of adult learning. He defines the seven kinds of adult intelligence and provides the necessary background for successfully addressing the different learning styles for maximum benefit.

Product Details
  • Amazon Sales Rank: #58488 in Books
  • Published on: 2008-12-10
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: .40" h x 7.50" w x 9.20" l, .65 pounds
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 167 pages
Editorial Reviews

Review
Bill Rothwell has given us a rare gift--a book that is solid in its theory and practical in its implementation. From the importance of adult learning in today's workplace to the predictions of adult learning in the future, this is a practical guide that you will refer to again and again. Use this resource to expand your thinking and to discover unique and new approaches to solve familiar learning challenges. --Elaine Biech

This book is just what we need--a succinct summary of all that is important to know about adult learning. A must for all trainers and community college educators! --Patrick E. Gerity, Ph.D., Vice President Continuing Education, Westmoreland Community College

There is nothing simple about presenting 60 years of learning theory in under 200 pages. Rothwell has brilliantly provided new practitioners in the field a concise and complete synopsis of learning theory and practice. If only this book had existed when I entered the profession, my early years in workplace learning would have been so much more productive. --Ethan Sanders, Fellow, ICF International

About the Author
William J. Rothwell is the president of Rothwell & Associates, a full-service consulting company focused on all services related to talent management. He is also a professor of Workforce Education and Development at Pennsylvania State University and the author of 62 books. He currently resides in State College, PA.

Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful.
5Just the Facts!
By K. DeVitto
ASTD really does publish some great books. IF you facilitate learning for adults this is a great start in understanding how and why adults learn. This is a must in any Trainers library.

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful.
3Not exactly what I was looking for
By Fun Cooking
I guess overall my thought about this book is that it wasn't exactly what I was looking for. Maybe this is because adult learning is such a big topic and the author took it in a direction that wasn't where I was most interested to go.

Chapter 2 was probably my favorite chapter of this book. I think Rothwell did a good job in that chapter going through the different adult learning theories. But a lot of the rest of the book seemed more tangential to adult learning theory--I guess that's why it's called "Adult Learning Basics," but I still think adult learning theories are one of the most important adult learning basics and could have used more face time. It may be that the other topics are topics Rothwell knows about, but I bought the book to learn more about adult learning theories, so I wasn't as interested in that part.

Also, I was a little disappointed with the references. I felt like Rothwell referenced his own work more than I expected. There were also more references to Wikipedia than I anticipated. Not that there's anything wrong with Wikipedia. It's just that I expect more scholarly references in this type of book.

Anyway, there was some good information and some author's opinion in this book, but it did include a good summary of the most well-known adult learning theories.

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful.
5Great for the Basics
By Deb
My department wanted all of to get learn more about Adult Learning. This book was a quick read and gave actionable advice.

http://astore.amazon.com/amazon-book-books-20/detail/1562865331

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